Limited edition print of the Helta Skelta on South Parade Pier, Portsmouth

£95

The print of Helta Skelta on South Parade Pier, Portsmouth is 26cm x 35cm giclee print not including the white boarder surround.

About the Helta Skelta on South Parade Pier, Portsmouth

South Parade Pier in Portsmouth was opened on the 26th July 1879 in true Victorian promenading style. Despite its serine look, the gods have conspired to destroy it several times, though still it stands.

In 1904 there was a fire which destroyed the pavilion. It was then sold to The Portsmouth Corporation for £10,782.  Four years later it reopened again as good as new.

To add a bit of revenue a ferry service was ran from the end. This service was discontinued by order of The Admiralty in 1915 because of fears of being attacked by the German navy.

Opened again after WW1, though more trouble in WW2 when it was partly dismantled to discourage invasion by German forces. How dismantling a pier would prevent the Nazi war machine rolling into England, lord only knows.

Once the war was over the pier settled down again to the boom in post war tourism, until a fateful day in 1974. Ken Russel used the pier as a location for his film Tommy, featuring the rock band The Who. We are not totally sure what happened though during the shoot the pier went on fire again and the damage was so bad it could have been the end for South Parade Pier.

Somehow the money was for repair was gathered together and it was made safe and repaired, though without the theatre.

It was however almost a stay of execution because due to foreign travel it went into steady decline over the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s and early 2000’s. It was eventually closed for a few years as it became unsafe.

Rescue came in 2010 with local new investors. Since that time the pier is back on the up again and is a real draw for local people and tourists all year round. On this day I painted the extremely popular Helta Sketa. I loved the red and white stripes.

If you are ever in Portsmouth, do visit the South Parade Pier, though try not to smoke.

The print of Helta Skelta on South Parade Pier, Portsmouth is 26cm x 35cm giclee print not including the white boarder surround.

About the Helta Skelta on South Parade Pier, Portsmouth

South Parade Pier in Portsmouth was opened on the 26th July 1879 in true Victorian promenading style. Despite its serine look, the gods have conspired to destroy it several times, though still it stands.

In 1904 there was a fire which destroyed the pavilion. It was then sold to The Portsmouth Corporation for £10,782.  Four years later it reopened again as good as new.

To add a bit of revenue a ferry service was ran from the end. This service was discontinued by order of The Admiralty in 1915 because of fears of being attacked by the German navy.

Opened again after WW1 though more trouble in WW2 when it was partly dismantled to discourage invasion by German forces. How dismantling a pier would prevent the Nazi war machine rolling into England, lord only knows.

Once the war was over the pier settled down again to the boom in post war tourism, until a fateful day in 1974. Ken Russel used the pier as a location for his film Tommy, featuring the rock band The Who. We are not totally sure what happened though during the shoot the pier went on fire again and the damage was so bad it could have been the end for South Parade Pier.

Somehow the money was for repair was gathered together and it was made safe and repaired, though without the theatre.

It was however almost a stay of execution because due to foreign travel it went into steady decline over the 70’s, 80’s, 90’s and early 2000’s. It was eventually closed for a few years as it became unsafe.

Rescue came in 2010 with local new investors. Since that time the pier is back on the up again and is a real draw for local people and tourists all year round. On this day I painted the extremely popular Helta Sketa. I loved the red and white stripes.

If you are ever in Portsmouth, do visit the South Parade Pier, though try not to smoke.

SKU: LEP_S-P-Pier Category:

Additional information

Delivery and shipping:

Once ordered I will try to deliver the print within ten working days. The prints are supplied in a tube. Price does not include shipping. This is added at the ‘Basket’ stage.

30 day money back guarantee

There is a 30 day money back guarantee on everything on my site should you not be satisfied. I will return you the money as soon as the item arrives back to me.

Number in the edition:

50 prints only, each individually signed and numbered.

Size unwrapped:

26cm x 35cm giclee print not including the white boarder surround.

What is a giclee print?

Giclee is a very high quality print process used by galleries and artists for exclusive limited editions. This Giclee process uses 12 true pigment artist colours (ultra marine, ochre etc) rather than the standard four dye colours in normal printing, so Giclee delivers greater depth in colour, tonal values and no yellowing over time.